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Events of the week: December 12th update

Updated: 12/12/2017

December 12th update:

We are having another fun and busy week!  Research and building parachutes; troubleshooting and testing them; social studies test today, studying for our next science test next week (December 19th, Tuesday)  and the list goes on!

2nd graders have completed FOUR parachutes for the Jack and the Beanstalk STEM Project!  We have tested which ones work the best and which ones would bring poor Jack down too quickly.   STEM FAIR is Wednesday, December 13th, from 9 to 11am.  Hope you can stop by and question the 2nd grade scientists.

The Scholastic Book Fair continues running for Wednesday and Thursday.  Perhaps you can fit in a visit after the STEM FAIR, as 2nd graders will be going down right after the fair, from about 11:15 to Noon.  Wednesday Book fair hours until 4pm.


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December 11th, 2017

Hands on design of stem project for Stem Fair this Thursday, December 14th

 Jack and the Beanstalk parachute STEM: 2nd grade

Summary

After a discussion about what a parachute is and how it works, students create parachutes using different materials that they think will work best. They test their designs, and then contribute to a class discussion (and possible journal writing) to report which paper materials worked best.

Engineering Connection

Aerodynamics and fluid flow concepts are used by engineers to design planes, parachutes and ships. Accounting for drag is an important aspect of these designs; engineers redesign the shape and materials used to get better results.

Learning Objectives

  • Students will analyse and create techniques for designing a parachute that falls slowly.

  • Students will analyse and trouble shoot which type of material works best by testing different options.

  • Students will examine how air resistance plays a role in flying by analysing fabric contents and making a hypothesis on what physical factors affect air resistance.

Introduction/Motivation

What is the purpose of a parachute? What is the role of a parachute in skydiving?

Imagine you are jumping out of a plane 10,000 feet in the air. What type of material would you want your parachute to be made of and what size would you want it to be?

The design of a parachute is very important, especially in an extreme sport such as skydiving because someone's life is dependent on the parachute functioning correctly. Engineers thoroughly test the materials and designs of parachutes to ensure that they open as intended and reliably, and are strong enough to withstand the air resistance needed to slow skydivers to safe landing speeds.

Procedure

Background

A parachute is an umbrella-shaped device of light fabric used especially for making a safe jump from aircraft. Due to the resistance of air, a drag force acts on a falling body (parachute) to slow down its motion. Without air resistance, or drag, objects would continue to increase speed until they hit the ground. The larger the object, the greater its air resistance. Parachutes use a large canopy to increase air resistance. This gives a slow fall and a soft landing.

Recommended resources:

A history of parachutes, plus good pictures: http://www.parachutehistory.com/

With the Students

  1. Gather materials.

  2. Discuss with the class what a parachute is and how it works.

  3. Have student teams brainstorm characteristics of a good parachute, document their thoughts and sketch their design before construction begins.

  • Discussion questions; with students after project

  • What type of paper is the best material to make a parachute? Why?

  • What materials did not work well? Why?

  • What changes could you make to improve your design?

Activity Extensions

Using the paper material that worked the best, do the same activity testing the parachute size. Have students test circles with different radii to find the optimal size.

Try parachutes with and without holes in the top, and different-sized holes.

Make parachutes using different materials, such as plastics, cotton and nylon.

Hold a competition to find a design that can land a toy vehicle most gently.


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December 4th:  Students writing today was excellent and a lot of fun as they wrote about their weekends.  Ask them what they need to write an interesting essay!  Their stories are amazing.  I will make copies to take home as we have hung originals in the hallway.

We are starting on telling time.  Some children know it already, and some of us are starting out.  Please practice at home with your child.

Today we found out we were leading the  prayer service on Wednesday at 11am.  Some students were picked randomly by our Popsicle stick system to read a short paragraph for the service.  

We are starting our new STEM project on designing a parachute for "Jack" as he tries to parachute down the beanstalk.  STEM involves science, technology, engineering and math, so this project will be worked on over a few days.  I have attached part of the lesson plan so you can see a bit of what we are going to do!


Carol Whelihan Jack and the Beanstalk parachute STEM: 2nd grade

Summary

After a discussion about what a parachute is and how it works, students create parachutes using different materials that they think will work best. They test their designs, and then contribute to a class discussion (and possible journal writing) to report which paper materials worked best.

Engineering Connection

Aerodynamics and fluid flow concepts are used by engineers to design planes, parachutes and ships. Accounting for drag is an important aspect of these designs; engineers redesign the shape and materials used to get better results.

Learning Objectives

  • Students will analyse and create techniques for designing a parachute that falls slowly.

  • Students will analyse and trouble shoot which type of material works best by testing different options.

  • Students will examine how air resistance plays a role in flying by analysing fabric contents and making a hypothesis on what physical factors affect air resistance.

Introduction/Motivation

What is the purpose of a parachute? What is the role of a parachute in skydiving?

Imagine you are jumping out of a plane 10,000 feet in the air. What type of material would you want your parachute to be made of and what size would you want it to be?

The design of a parachute is very important, especially in an extreme sport such as skydiving because someone's life is dependent on the parachute functioning correctly. Engineers thoroughly test the materials and designs of parachutes to ensure that they open as intended and reliably, and are strong enough to withstand the air resistance needed to slow skydivers to safe landing speeds.

Procedure

Background

A parachute is an umbrella-shaped device of light fabric used especially for making a safe jump from aircraft. Due to the resistance of air, a drag force acts on a falling body (parachute) to slow down its motion. Without air resistance, or drag, objects would continue to increase speed until they hit the ground. The larger the object, the greater its air resistance. Parachutes use a large canopy to increase air resistance. This gives a slow fall and a soft landing.

Recommended resources:

A history of parachutes, plus good pictures: http://www.parachutehistory.com/

With the Students

  1. Gather materials.

  2. Discuss with the class what a parachute is and how it works.

  3. Have student teams brainstorm characteristics of a good parachute, document their thoughts and sketch their design before construction begins.

  • Discussion questions; with students after project

  • What type of paper is the best material to make a parachute? Why?

  • What materials did not work well? Why?

  • What changes could you make to improve your design?

Activity Extensions

Using the paper material that worked the best, do the same activity testing the parachute size. Have students test circles with different radii to find the optimal size.

Try parachutes with and without holes in the top, and different-sized holes.

Make parachutes using different materials, such as plastics, cotton and nylon.

Hold a competition to find a design that can land a toy vehicle most gently.


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What we did in class for November 28th: Among other things we practiced our benchmark comprehension tests to prepare for the terra nova tests in Spring.  We do this every Tuesday.

We are now great dictionary detectives as we are able to look up almost any word in our student dictionaries.

We did one-act plays on making good choices with our friends for part of religion class.

We continued to practice estimation, double digit subtraction, and double digit subtraction with regrouping.

We practised using our base ten flats, rods and units to visually show a 2 digit subtraction problem in regrouping.

We did a character study on Juno from our "Dear Juno" reading text.  For doing such good work, we had an art treat and created snowflakes to go with our "Dear Juno" text.

We had a guest teacher for GYM!!



Thank you to all the family members that sent in their parent conference choices.

1.   I will have the schedule for you on Monday, November 20th.  Scheduled times will be sent home in the student communications folder.

 2.   Student work portfolios on all subjects for the first trimester will be given out to parents/caregivers during conferences.  Each subject is organized into packets with comments.  Please take a few days to look over all the wonderful work your child has accomplished.

3.   I would appreciate it if you could sign the top copy on each organized subject packet/portfolio and return back to the class in your child's backpack by Wednesday, December 6th.  Thank you!

4.  The trimester ends a week from today.  Because we are starting new material after Thanksgiving break, there will be no homework over the four day break.  I know many people are travelling, etc.  and so to co-ordinate with this, there will be no homework that weekend.






Monday, September 25th:

What we tried today, September 25th:

ELA: nouns and adjectives to brighten and describe our nouns.

Stretch a sentence using adjectives.  Large rug size banner of whole class stretch a sentence contributions. For example:  I ate a steak.  I ate a juicy, sizzling, hot steak.

reading: Henry and Mudge; Exploration of the Desert.

Computers: 9:40 to 10:30.

Science: we are formulating our science pamphlet on plant life.  We are discussing and organizing higher level questioning on several plant topics including using graphs for our information.

We will have our pamphlets finished this week.

We are cutting into our water depleted potatoes and celery, and examining the effects under magnifying glasses. 


Words to know: water, sunlight, soil, air, space,  root, stem, leaves, flower and a definiton of how these elements are needed for plant life.

Social Studies: an understanding of the Earth's surface and what physical attributes make up the earth.

Guided Reading testing.